10 fun facts about flamingos - Birdland Park & Gardens

10 fun facts about flamingos

  • The word Flamingo comes from the Spanish and Latin word ‘flamenco’ which mean fire, it refers to the bright colours of the bird’s feathers
  • Flamingo chicks are born grey when hatched
  • Flamingos pink colour is obtained from its diet. Each flamingos’ shade of pink varies by species, with the Caribbean species a vivid pink and the Greater species a pale pink
  • The Greater Flamingo (one of the species we home here at Birdland) is the most widespread and largest member of the flamingo family
  • Fully grown flamingo male birds can grow in excess of 180cm tall – that’s the same as supermodel height of 5’11
  • A typical lifespan for a flamingo bird in a zoo is an astonishing 60 years, with the longest lifespan recorded being a bird at an Australian Zoo, who lived to be 83
  • Flamingos are powerful fliers, when flying in a flock, the top speed of a flamingo can be as high as 35 miles per hour
  • Flamingos (like penguins) are monogamous birds. The females lay only a single egg each year, if anything happens to that egg which results in it no hatching, flamingos don’t typically lay a replacement which means it can often take several years for the flamingo population to grow
  • Flamingos find strength in numbers for breeding success, they are birds which do not live in small flocks but rather, flocks of up to a million or more have been recorded. Typical smaller flock numbers are a couple of dozen
  • A flock of flamingos are called a colony, regiment or flamboyance. These terms refer to any size flock of flamingos greater than two (who are simply known as a pair)

 

Birdland homes a flock of 36 flamingos, split down the middle with 18 males and 18 females, come and visit these fascinating birds and observe their elaborate courtship displays, dancing and synchronisation in our stunning nine-acre garden grounds.

Sign Up for our newsletter